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dc.contributor.authorCasey, Siobhán
dc.contributor.authorAvalos, Gloria
dc.contributor.authorDowling, Maura
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-06T16:11:19Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-21
dc.identifier.citationCasey, Siobhán, Avalos, Gloria, & Dowling, Maura. (2018). Critical care nurses’ knowledge of alarm fatigue and practices towards alarms: A multicentre study. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, 48, 36-41. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.iccn.2018.05.004en_IE
dc.identifier.issn1532-4036
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/14670
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To determine critical care nurses' knowledge of alarm fatigue and practices toward alarms in critical care settings.Research methodology/design: A cross-sectional survey using an adaptation of The Health Technology Foundation Clinical Alarms Survey.Setting: A sample of critical care nurses (n = 250) from 10 departments across six hospitals in Ireland.Results: A response rate of 66% (n = 166) was achieved. All hospital sites reported patient adverse events related to clinical alarms. The majority of nurses (52%, n = 86) did not know or were unsure, how to prevent alarm fatigue. Most nurses (90%, n = 148) agreed that non-actionable alarms occurred frequently, disrupted patient care (91%, n = 145) and reduced trust in alarms prompting nurses to sometimes disable alarms (81%, n= 132). Nurses claiming to know how to prevent alarm fatigue stated they customised patient alarm parameters frequently (p = 0.037). Frequent false alarms causing reduced attention or response to alarms ranked the number one obstacle to effective alarm management; this was followed by inadequate staff to respond to alarms. Only 31% (n = 50) believed that alarm management policies and procedures were used effectively.Conclusion: Alarm fatigue has the potential for serious consequences for patient safety and answering numerous alarms drains nursing resources. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherElsevieren_IE
dc.relation.ispartofIntensive And Critical Care Nursingen
dc.subjectAlarm fatigueen_IE
dc.subjectAlarm managementen_IE
dc.subjectClinical alarmsen_IE
dc.subjectPatient safetyen_IE
dc.subjectCLINICAL ALARMSen_IE
dc.subjectATTITUDESen_IE
dc.subjectSAFETYen_IE
dc.titleCritical care nurses’ knowledge of alarm fatigue and practices towards alarms: A multicentre studyen_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2018-12-03T20:57:26Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.iccn.2018.05.004
dc.local.publishedsourcehttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.iccn.2018.05.004en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.description.embargo2019-05-21
dc.internal.rssid14966933
dc.local.contactMaura Dowling, School Of Nursing And Midwifery, Room 415 Aras Moyola, Newcastle Road, Galway. 3833 Email: maura.dowling@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedYes
dc.local.versionACCEPTED
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