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dc.contributor.authorMoriarty, Orla
dc.contributor.authorFinn, David P.
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-29T14:49:56Z
dc.date.available2019-03-29T14:49:56Z
dc.date.issued2014-06
dc.identifier.citationMoriarty, Orla, & Finn, David P. (2014). Cognition and pain. Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care, 8(2), 130-136. doi: 10.1097/spc.0000000000000054en_IE
dc.identifier.issn1751-4266
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/15078
dc.description.abstractPurpose of reviewPain and cognition share common neural substrates and are known to interact reciprocally. This has implications for treatment and management of pain conditions; pain can negatively affect cognitive performance, whereas cognitively demanding tasks may reduce pain perception. This article will review recent research investigating the impact of pain on cognition and the cognitive modulation of pain.Recent findingsRecent clinical and preclinical studies have provided new evidence for impairment of cognition in pain with a focus on the type of cognitive construct affected and the influence of factors such as age and pain localization. Reduced connectivity between important brain structures has emerged as a possible underlying mechanism. Imaging studies have continued to identify neuroanatomical structures involved in different types of cognitive pain modulation, and attempts have been made to delineate the descending pathways by which pain relief is achieved. New and established methods to investigate cognitive modulation of pain in animal models have revealed insights into the molecular and neurochemical mechanisms involved.SummaryProgress has been made in understanding the complex relationship between pain and cognitive function. However, both synthesis of current research findings and further novel research studies are required to maximize the therapeutic potential.en_IE
dc.description.sponsorshipGrant support from Science Foundation Ireland (10/IN.1/B2976) and by the Irish Higher Education Authority’s Programme for Research in Third Level Institutions Cycle 4 is gratefully acknowledged.en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkinsen_IE
dc.relation.ispartofCurrent opinion in supportive and palliative careen
dc.subjectanalgesiaen_IE
dc.subjectattentionen_IE
dc.subjectcognitionen_IE
dc.subjectdescending pain inhibitionen_IE
dc.subjectpainen_IE
dc.subjectFEAR-CONDITIONED ANALGESIAen_IE
dc.subjectWORKING-MEMORYen_IE
dc.subjectPLACEBO ANALGESIAen_IE
dc.subjectPREFRONTAL CORTEXen_IE
dc.subjectFUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITYen_IE
dc.subjectFIBROMYALGIA SYNDROMEen_IE
dc.subjectINFLAMMATORY PAINen_IE
dc.subjectBRAIN MECHANISMSen_IE
dc.subjectDECISION-MAKINGen_IE
dc.subjectRATSen_IE
dc.titleCognition and painen_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2019-03-27T14:02:30Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/SPC.0000000000000054
dc.local.publishedsourcehttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SPC.0000000000000054en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.contributor.funderScience Foundation Irelanden_IE
dc.internal.rssid6679284
dc.local.contactDavid Finn, Dept. Of Pharmacology &, Therapeutics, Nui, Galway. 5280 Email: david.finn@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedYes
dc.local.versionACCEPTED
dcterms.projectinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Principal Investigator Programme (PI)/10/IN.1/B2976/IE/The role of the endocannabinoid system in anxiety-induced modulation of pain: sites and mechanisms of action/en_IE
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