Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTønnessen, Siri
dc.contributor.authorScott, Anne
dc.contributor.authorNortvedt, Per
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-20T08:38:35Z
dc.date.available2020-07-20T08:38:35Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-18
dc.identifier.citationTønnessen, Siri, Scott, Anne, & Nortvedt, Per. (2020). Safe and competent nursing care: An argument for a minimum standard? Nursing Ethics. doi:10.1177/0969733020919137en_IE
dc.identifier.issn0969-7330
dc.identifier.issn1477-0989
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10379/16087
dc.description.abstractThere is no agreed minimum standard with regard to what is considered safe, competent nursing care. Limited resources and organizational constraints make it challenging to develop a minimum standard. As part of their everyday practice, nurses have to ration nursing care and prioritize what care to postpone, leave out, and/or omit. In developed countries where public healthcare is tax-funded, a minimum level of healthcare is a patient right; however, what this entails in a given patient's actual situation is unclear. Thus, both patients and nurses would benefit from the development of a minimum standard of nursing care. Clarity on this matter is also of ethical and legal concern. In this article, we explore the case for developing a minimum standard to ensure safe and competent nursing care services. Any such standard must encompass knowledge of basic principles of clinical nursing and preservation of moral values, as well as managerial issues, such as manpower planning, skill-mix, and time to care. In order for such standards to aid in providing safe and competent nursing care, they should be in compliance with accepted evidence-based nursing knowledge, based on patients' needs and legal rights to healthcare and on nurses' codes of ethics. That is, a minimum standard must uphold a satisfactory level of quality in terms of both professionalism and ethics. Rather than being fixed, the minimum standard should be adjusted according to patients' needs in different settings and may thus be different in different contexts and countries.en_IE
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_IE
dc.language.isoenen_IE
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen_IE
dc.relation.ispartofNursing Ethicsen
dc.subjectQUALITY-OF-CAREen_IE
dc.subjectHEALTH-CAREen_IE
dc.subjectCOUNTRIESen_IE
dc.subjectOUTCOMESen_IE
dc.subjectBURNOUTen_IE
dc.subjectNURSESen_IE
dc.titleSafe and competent nursing care: An argument for a minimum standard?en_IE
dc.typeArticleen_IE
dc.date.updated2020-07-17T18:20:33Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0969733020919137
dc.local.publishedsourcehttps://doi.org/10.1177/0969733020919137en_IE
dc.description.peer-reviewedpeer-reviewed
dc.internal.rssid21244682
dc.local.contactAnne Scott, -. - Email: anne.scott@nuigalway.ie
dc.local.copyrightcheckedYes - open access publication
nui.item.downloads34


Files in this item

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland
This item is available under the Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland. No item may be reproduced for commercial purposes. Please refer to the publisher's URL where this is made available, or to notes contained in the item itself. Other terms may apply.

The following license files are associated with this item:

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record